For more than a couple years now I’ve wanted to make homemade caramels to give as gifts at Christmas.  I found myself with some heavy cream in my fridge for a recipe I didn’t end up using, so it seemed like the perfect opportunity to finally do it!

I can’t believe it took me so long to finally get around to making these!  Much simpler (and less messy) than making cookies, these caramels are the perfect addition to a holiday treat bag.  I must admit, the presence of fleur de sel wasn’t as prominent as I’d hoped,  but that doesn’t detract from the deliciousness.  These also weren’t quite as soft as I was thinking they would be, but that might have been my fault, as I didn’t notice the mixture had reached the “soft ball” stage until it was a couple degrees past!  You’ve really got to keep an eye on it, as it can change fast.  Either way, this is a recipe I’d definitely make again, perhaps upping the amount of salt, and keeping a closer eye on the thermometer.  These were well received with the staff of the show I edit, that I gave them to as well.  So here ya go Kahla, here’s the recipe.  😉


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Fleur de Sel Caramels


from Gourmet, via Epicurious

Ingredients:

1 cup heavy cream
5 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into pieces
1 teaspoon fleur de sel
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup light corn syrup
1/4 cup water

Special equipment: parchment paper; a deep-fat thermometer

Directions:

Line bottom and sides of an 8-inch square baking pan with parchment paper, then lightly oil parchment.

Bring cream, butter, and fleur de sel to a boil in a small saucepan, then remove from heat and set aside.

Boil sugar, corn syrup, and water in a 3- to 4-quart heavy saucepan, stirring until sugar is dissolved.

Boil, without stirring but gently swirling pan, until mixture is a light golden caramel.

Carefully stir in cream mixture (mixture will bubble up) and simmer, stirring frequently, until caramel registers 248°F on thermometer, 10 to 15 minutes. Pour into baking pan and cool 2 hours. Cut into 1-inch pieces, then wrap each piece in a 4-inch square of wax paper, twisting 2 ends to close.